Tag: doctors

By iwano@_84

Black Doctors Work to Make Coronavirus Testing More Equitable

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

When the coronavirus arrived in Philadelphia in March, Dr. Ala Stanford hunkered down at home with her husband and kids. A pediatric surgeon with a private practice, she has staff privileges at a few suburban Philadelphia hospitals. For weeks, most of her usual procedures and patient visits were canceled. So she found herself, like a lot of people, spending the days in her pajamas, glued to the TV.

And then, at the beginning of April, she started seeing media reports indicating that Black people were contracting the coronavirus and dying from COVID-19 at greater rates than other demographic groups.

“It just hit me like, what is going on?” said Stanford.

At the same time, she started hearing from Black friends who couldn’t get tested because they didn’t have a doctor’s referral or didn’t meet the testing

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By iwano@_84

Some U.S. doctors flee to New Zealand where the outbreak is under control and science is respected

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Hagen Hopkins | Getty Images

Dr. Judy Melinek knew it was time to make a change when she started fear for her health and safety.

While working as acting chief forensic pathologist for Alameda County in California, she read early reports about a virus in Wuhan, China. By June, after repeatedly sounding the alarm about the need for health workers to have sufficient personal protective equipment, she’d had enough. She also hoped for temperature checks, social distancing and masks, but she noticed that not all of the staff in her office were taking these steps.

And then an email appeared offering her the opportunity to relocate to New Zealand, a country that has reported less than 2,000 coronavirus cases and 25 deaths, drawing widespread

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By iwano@_84

Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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By iwano@_84

Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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By iwano@_84

Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’



a group of people standing in front of a building: Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: 'No more spin doctors'


© Getty Images
Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’

The Washington Post’s editorial board on Friday called for the White House to be more transparent about the state of President Trump’s health, demanding “no more spin doctors.”

“All presidents like to project robust health and are loath to admit weakness, even if caused by events beyond their control.” the board wrote in an opinion piece, citing when President Reagan was shot in 1981.

“But when a president’s health is abnormal, the public has a right to know, especially if the problem has any effect on his fitness to perform his duties. In Mr. Trump’s case, the unanswered questions are glaring,” they continued.

Trump was brought to the Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday, Oct. 2, just hours after announcing that both he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for the

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By iwano@_84

The Difference Between PCOS And Endometriosis, Explained By Doctors

In the world of reproductive conditions that can be tough to diagnose, two tend to get the most attention: polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis. While you’ve probably at least heard of both of these conditions, you might be fuzzy on the details. And, with that, it’s easy to confuse the two.

It’s important to know that it’s not rare to have either one of these health issues. “These are two relatively common gynecological conditions,” says Taraneh Shirazian, MD, an ob-gyn with NYU Langone Health. PCOS affects one in 10 women of childbearing age, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). Endometriosis is slightly more common, impacting more than 11 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the OWH.

Both conditions are notoriously tough to diagnose, given that their symptoms could be caused by a range of

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By iwano@_84

As virus fills French ICUs anew, doctors ask what went wrong

PARIS (AP) — Over the course of a single overnight shift this week, three new COVID-19 patients were rushed into Dr. Karim Debbat’s small intensive care ward in the southern French city of Arles. His service now has more virus patients than during the pandemic’s first wave, and is scrambling to create new ICU beds elsewhere in the hospital to accommodate the sick.

Similar scenes are playing out across France. COVID-19 patients now occupy 40% of ICU beds in the Paris region, and nearly a quarter in ICUs nationwide, as several weeks of growing infections among young people spread to vulnerable populations.

Despite being one of the world’s richest nations — and one of those hardest hit when the pandemic first washed over the world — France hasn’t added significant ICU capacity or the staff needed to manage extra beds, according to national health agency figures and doctors at multiple

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By iwano@_84

NY doctors were at the center of COVID battle. Here’s what they say about the fall.

The city’s daily positivity rate — which was around 1% for months — crossed the 3% threshold last week, marking the highest daily positivity rate the city has logged since June, and climbing as high as 8.4% in some neighborhoods.

While those numbers pale in comparison to the spring, when tests were hard to come by (and the city’s positivity rate soared as high as 71%), the rise has put experts on guard.

A high positivity rate can be a sign that a city is only testing its sickest patients and failing to cast a net wide enough

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By iwano@_84

Doctors must be aware of effects of racism on kids’ health, pediatrician’s group says

As the struggle against racism continues to simmer across the United States, the American Academy of Pediatrics took a hard look at racial gaps in health care for children during its recent annual meeting.

“We know racism is a social determinant of health, and it’s a public health issue, so we spent a great deal of time focusing on that,” Dr. Elizabeth Murray, a pediatrician with the University of Rochester Medical Center, said during a recent HD Live! interview.

Pediatricians need to become more aware of how racism affects both the physical and mental health of children, said Murray, a spokesperson for the academy.

“We need to talk about racism and learn how to be anti-racist, and that we all have work to do,” Murray said. “We also need to identify the traumas that are experienced by children and people of color as happening on a regular basis throughout this

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By iwano@_84

Doctors and nurses battle virus skeptics

MISSION, Kan. (AP) — Treating the sick and dying isn’t even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America.

It’s dealing with patients and relatives who don’t believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S.

Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested.


It’s unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren’t optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. … I feel

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