Day: October 1, 2020

By iwano@_84

The Latest: SDakota Reports All-Time High Virus Death Toll | World News

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — South Dakota health officials have reported all-time highs for the toll of the coronavirus with 13 deaths and 747 more people who tested positive.

State epidemiologist Josh Clayton says communities statewide — from cities to rural areas — are seeing significant levels of the virus. He noted that 245 of the infections reported were backlogged from previous days after a reporting error.

One of the largest outbreaks came from a women’s prison in Pierre as mass testing revealed that 29 more women in one housing unit had the virus. A total of 197 prisoners and staff have tested positive and 110 have recovered.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Push to bring coronavirus vaccines to the poor faces trouble

— In Appalachia, people watch COVID-19, race issues from afar

— NFL postpones Steelers-Titans game after more positive tests

— The White

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By iwano@_84

Virtual fitness classes allow this community battling addiction to gain strength during lockdown | Live Well

Mattingly: There’s no silver lining or bright spots for many people over the last several months. Do you feel that whenever we get back to normal, this will end up almost being beneficial for the reach you were able to achieve?

Strode: I do. The idea that people can find recovery support through Phoenix now, really almost anytime, anywhere in the world is really exciting. It’ll just allow it to reach so many more people because of this virtual platform. I didn’t realize how much that was limiting our ability to get our programs to people who really needed it.

It just always lifts my heart to log into a Phoenix virtual class and meet somebody in recovery who’s doing the workout in their basement somewhere in Tennessee, where we don’t even have in-person programs, but they can come to the Phoenix anyway.

Mattingly: For somebody who’s isolated at home

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By iwano@_84

118 COVID-19 Cases Confirmed In Iredell In Less Than A Week

IREDELL COUNTY, NC — The number of known COVID-19 cases in Iredell County rose to 3,182 Thursday, an increase of 118 new cases confirmed in the county in less than a week, according to Iredell County Health Department data.

As of Sept. 25, Iredell County reported 3,064 cases. Almost half of the new cases reported so far this week — at least 57 —were confirmed in southern Iredell County since Friday.

Health officials also recorded a new coronavirus death this week, raising the county’s death toll to 41. At least 10 county residents remained hospitalized for COVID-19 illness as of Thursday afternoon. Out of the total tally of known cases in the county, 311 residents remained isolated in their homes and an estimated 2,820 cases were assumed recovered.

The number of known coronavirus cases in North Carolina rose to 212,909 total cases Oct. 1. The tally reflected a day-over-day increase

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By iwano@_84

COVID-19 changes at the dentist office

PERRYSBURG, Ohio (WTVG) -Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.



a group of people in a room: Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.


© Provided by Toledo WTVG
Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.

“I think patients can feel very comfortable going back to dentist offices and I very much encourage them to do so,” said Owens Community College Dental Hygiene Instructor Sue Nichols.

Inside Owens Health Technologies Hall dental students are back on campus hard at work, honing their craft with hands-on clinicals. Dental Hygiene students can be found working inside the mouths of their peers, learning how to properly provide teeth cleaning services and proper oral care. This semester looks a bit different amid COVID-19 for the class of 25 students within the program.

“The first thing we really implemented was that all of the students have to wear face

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By iwano@_84

A family of 7 lost their home in Washington’s wildfires. Then they all got Covid-19

They have now quarantined themselves in two hotel rooms in Spokane Valley, where they’re recovering and trying to plan their futures.

The Grahams lost their home, a barn and outbuildings where they stored things they weren’t using, special baby clothes and other family mementos. Their dog was OK and their chicken coop was also spared, though some of the birds’ feathers may have been singed.

“We were planning to come back that night, so we didn’t pack a single thing,” Jessica said.

They stayed with family after the fire and think that’s how they were exposed to the coronavirus — Jessica’s dad had flu-like symptoms and Matthew’s mom tested positive on September 20 after she’d babysat the children.

“We were starting to experience symptoms at that time that we were hoping was just due to hazardous air quality,” Jessica said. “But then that had gone away and we were getting

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By iwano@_84

Waltham’s Coronavirus Risk Level Rises To Moderate

WALTHAM, MA — After the city’s coronavirus risk level rose to moderate this week, the city issued an alert imploring people to follow state guidelines Thursday.

“Please wear your mask, physical distance, and wash your hands. Follow state guidelines for gatherings, a maximum of 50 people outdoors and 25 people indoors. Your cooperation during this difficult time will help in stopping the spread of COVID19,” read an alert.

It was followed up by a phone call with an automated message for those who subscribe to the alert system.

Based on the average daily cases per 100,000 residents, each city or town has been designated as a higher risk (red), moderate risk (yellow), or lower risk (green) community. Waltham now falls in the yellow zone with an average rate of 4.5 cases per 100,000, according to state data.

Since the state began counting cases of the coronavirus in March, 1,413 people

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By iwano@_84

Federal Prisons Will Let Inmates Have Visitors During Pandemic

The federal prison system “is committed to protecting the health and welfare of those individuals entrusted to our care, as well as our staff, their families, and the communities where we live and work,” the agency said in a statement.

Inmates and prison officials have said the inability of inmates to see loved ones — combined with the fear of becoming sick and having been largely restricted to cells or crowded dormitories — had exacerbated existing mental illnesses.

But not everyone is pleased with the return of in-person visits.

Mr. McGlothin, the federal prison employee in California, said that when he went to officials with concerns about the risks of renewed visits, he was told that the new partitions would help and that the plan would be safe.

“I said, ‘Safe for who?’” Mr. McGlothin said.

Even some families were reluctant.

Nina Schunck said that she and her daughter, an

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By iwano@_84

Jeffries Says Sanofi Is ‘Most Compelling’ European Pharma Stock

– By Barry Cohen

Here’s a switch: Analysts are predicting sales for a Sanofi (NASDAQ:SNY) blockbuster drug that exceeds the company’s forecast.

Jefferies analysts wrote Dupixent revenue is likely to peak at $12.5 billion, according to an article in FiercePharma. That’s about 8% higher than Sanofi CEO Paul Hudson has set for the medication.

Dupixent is the first biologic medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adults and children aged six years and up with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis for whom topical treatments have not worked or are not advised.

Atopic is the most common type of eczema, affecting more than 9.6 million children and about 16.5 million adults in the United States, according to the National Eczema Association. It’s a chronic condition that can come and go for years or throughout life and can overlap with other types of eczema. The condition triggers inflammation that damages

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By iwano@_84

Experts: Tackling Poverty and Racism as Public Health Crises Requires Rapid Action | National News

Late last month, the Healthcare Anchor Network, a coalition of more than three dozen health systems in 45 states and Washington, D.C., released a public statement declaring: “It is undeniable: Racism is a public health crisis.” In the wake of the killing of George Floyd in May, many states, cities and counties across the United States issued similar declarations, according to the American Public Health Association.

While it is becoming clear that ZIP code may matter more to longevity than genetic code, some public health experts have been sounding the alarm for decades. Indeed, poverty and racism have an enormous – and devastating – impact on health, according to a panel of experts brought together for a webinar hosted by U.S. News & World Report as part of the Community Health Leadership Forum, a new virtual event series.

In Chicago, as just one example, life expectancy between some

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By iwano@_84

Health officials urge Americans to get flu vaccine as concerns mount over possible ‘twindemic’

During the annual Influenza/Pneumococcal Disease news conference on Thursday, hosted by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, public health experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, urged the public to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation for everyone to get vaccinated against flu.

“Everybody, 6 months of age or older, should get an annual flu vaccine,” asserted Fauci.

“Influenza, all by itself, is a profoundly serious viral infection, which causes hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year, with the major complication being pneumonia, and many thousands of deaths,” Dr. William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told ABC News.

Only

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