Day: October 2, 2020

By iwano@_84

Amazon Reviewers Are Obsessed With This $28 Fitness Tracker

If you need help meeting your health and exercise goals, then a reliable fitness tracker might be the extra push you’re looking for. In fact, results from a past Good Housekeeping survey found that 75% of people said using a fitness tracker helped improve their motivation to work out. But with so many different options on the market, it can be hard to figure out which one is right for you — and your budget.

The experts at the Good Housekeeping Institute’s Media and Tech Lab have tested and evaluated dozens of popular fitness trackers over the years in categories including ease of use, battery life, accuracy, comfort, and more. Our recommendation for the best overall fitness tracker is the Fitbit Versa 2. Across the board, Fitbits consistently come out on top in our tests, so it’s no surprise that many of the brand’s devices made the cut

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By iwano@_84

Trump is being treated with an experimental drug cocktail for COVID-19. Here’s what it is.

The White House says President Donald Trump is being treated for COVID-19 with an experimental drug cocktail. The president’s physician, Sean P. Conley, released a memo Friday afternoon saying the president has received a single 8 gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail, “as a precautionary measure.” 

The medication is still undergoing a clinical trial, with the first data from 275 non-hospitalized patients showing that “it reduced viral load and the time to alleviate symptoms,” the company said in a press release this week.

Along with the experimental drug, Conley noted that Mr. Trump is also taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine (the medication in Pepcid, for heartburn or acid reflux), melatonin and a daily aspirin. Late Friday afternoon, the president was transported to Walter Reed Medical Center for a few days of treatment — “out of an abundance of caution,” according to White House press secretary Kaleigh McEnany.

“President

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By iwano@_84

The best medicine for a COVID-19 economy? More education and training

Reading the tea leaves of a U.S. economy reshaped by COVID-19 has sent economic analysts and prognosticators into overdrive. Many see a move away from big cities and into simpler, socially distanced life in small towns. If this happens at scale, it could be a boon to heretofore “left-behind” places in the Midwest and other regions.

Others predict significant drops in demand for jobs with low education and training requirements, driven by automation and the growth of technology needed to operate socially distanced offices, warehouses, manufacturing facilities and even restaurants. A recently released analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia lends support to this idea.

Policymakers can adopt policies to help improve wages and opportunities in jobs with fewer credentialing requirements, for example by helping smaller manufacturers and boosting the minimum wage. But policy also needs to directly address the need for more workers with higher skills due both

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By iwano@_84

Depression and Biologic Use in Arthritis: Chicken or Egg?

Among patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the initiation of a biologic treatment or switching to another biologic was associated with an increased likelihood of the use of antidepressants and anxiolytics, Greek researchers found.

In a multivariate analysis that adjusted for age, sex, type of underlying disease, and concomitant treatment with glucocorticoids and conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there was a positive association between starting treatment with a biologic agent and the use of antidepressants (OR 1.248, 95% CI 1.153-1.350, P<0.0001) or anxiolytics (OR 1.178, 95% CI 1.099-1.263, P<0.0001), according to Petros P. Sfikakis, MD, of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, and colleagues.

Similarly, there was a positive association between switching to a different biologic and the use of antidepressants (OR 1.502, 95% CI 1.370-1.646, P<0.0001) or anxiolytics (OR 1.161, 95% CI 1.067-1.264, P=0.001), the researchers reported online in RMD Open: Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Diseases

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By iwano@_84

Coronavirus Positivity Rate Rises To 5.2% In Cook County Suburbs

COOK COUNTY, IL — After several weeks of declines in most parts of Illinois, coronavirus positivity rates crept up or remained stable across the state during the last week of September. Only one of the state’s 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions, Region 5 in Southern Illinois, reported a decrease in positivity of more than 0.2 percentage points, according to state public health officials.

In suburban Cook County, or Region 10, the coronavirus positivity rate increased last week to 5.2 percent Tuesday, the most recent day for which data is available from the department. That marks a rise of 0.7 percentage points over the prior week.

COVID-19 hospitalizations in the Cook County suburbs also rose, as calculated by the rounded rolling seven-day average of new admissions. The average number of new hospitalizations rose by two to 23 people a day. At the same time, the availability of surgical beds and intensive

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By iwano@_84

Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin departs from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on September 30. Mnuchin is one of the people who had contact with President Trump in the past week and was subsequently tested for coronavirus and reported a negative result.

Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag


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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin departs from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on September 30. Mnuchin is one of the people who had contact with President Trump in the past week and was subsequently tested for coronavirus and reported a negative result.

Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Several members of Congress and cabinet members who’ve spent time with President Trump in the last week were tested for coronavirus — and have announced the result was negative.

But that doesn’t mean they’re in the clear.

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By iwano@_84

Menopausal Symptoms Tied to Cardiovascular Risk

A new analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative CaD (Calcium and Vitamin D) trial showed that women with greater menopausal symptoms faced higher risk of cardiovascular illness, researchers said.

Women who had two or more moderate to severe menopausal symptoms had higher rates of stroke (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.89) and cardiovascular disease (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.18-1.54), reported Matthew Nudy, MD, of the Penn State Hershey Medical Center, and colleagues.

Moreover, calcium and vitamin D supplements did not mitigate risk of adverse health outcomes in this population, Nudy said in a presentation at the North American Menopause Society 2020 virtual meeting.

“More moderate or severe menopausal symptoms were associated with more cardiovascular disease and stroke,” Nudy said in the presentation. He added that it is unknown whether treating cardiovascular disease will reduce menopausal symptoms or vice versa.

Angelina Gangestad, MD, ob/gyn division chief at University Hospitals

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By iwano@_84

Biden campaign lodges ‘health and safety’ objection over VP debate

While social distancing guidelines call for at least 6 feet of space between individuals to avoid exposure to coronavirus, the Biden campaign argued that medical professionals recommend a greater distance of separation for individuals spending longer periods of time next to one another indoors. Pence and Harris are scheduled to face off Wednesday night for a 90-minute debate in Salt Lake City.

Biden campaign officials raised the candidate positioning as a “very serious concern,” according to the source, who said the campaign also cited unease over the lack of mask-wearing enforcement during the presidential debate in Cleveland. The source said the commission and the Trump campaign had supported the 7-foot spacing.

A commission spokesperson did not respond to requests for comment.

Later Friday, Trump campaign spokesman Tim Murtaugh told POLITICO the campaign would work to find middle ground.

“We are open to more space between the candidates, which we will

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By iwano@_84

Trump Has Treatment Options for Coronavirus. None of Them Are Good.

EDITOR’S NOTE: We’re making some of our coronavirus pandemic coverage free for nonsubscribers. You can read those articles here and subscribe to our newsletters here.
EDITOR’S NOTE: We’re making some of our coronavirus pandemic coverage free for nonsubscribers. You can read those articles here and subscribe to our newsletters here.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the dangerous disease COVID-19. Some of the president’s staff and individuals he has met recently have also tested positive for the virus, and results on a long list of White House and campaign staff are pending. Trump was taken to Walter Reed Military Medical Center Friday afternoon, where he will remain, White House officials say, for a few days. But what awaits him—and the country he still leads—as he deals with this virus?

Despite his 74 years and overweight frame, Trump has always tried

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By iwano@_84

Cell Therapy for Anthracycline Cardiomyopathy Safe, Feasible

In yet another trial of cell therapy for heart failure, this time in cancer survivors with anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC), administration of allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (allo-MSCs) was shown to be safe and feasible.

The phase 1 SENECA trial was conducted at multiple sites under the auspices of the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN) and was published online September 30 in JACC CardioOncology.

“This is the first in-human clinical trial of cell therapy for patients with anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy, a very serious disease with a very grim prognosis which is actually worse than ischemic cardiomyopathy, and for which treatment options are very limited at the moment,” first author Roberto Bolli, MD, professor of medicine and director of the University of Louisville’s Institute of Molecular Cardiology in Louisville, Kentucky, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.



Dr Roberto Bolli

“The study was successful in showing that the treatment is safe, we

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